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You are here: Home Free Software Supporter 2022 Free Software Supporter - Issue 167, March 2022

Free Software Supporter - Issue 167, March 2022

by Free Software Foundation Contributions Published on Feb 28, 2022 12:06 PM

Welcome to the Free Software Supporter, the Free Software Foundation's (FSF) monthly news digest and action update -- being read by you and 227,644 other activists. That's 190 more than last month!

This month's highlight: My appointment as the FSF's new executive director

From March 1

"As a free software activist, like many of you, each day, I am presented with almost innumerable choices between freedom and convenience, and each day I choose freedom wherever I can. I have learned to do this by questioning my tools, by joining this community, and by learning more and more about the ways that I can stand up for myself. If I can do that, I firmly believe we can reach anyone. I hope that you'll join me in rejecting the ways that Big Tech tries to deprive us of our freedoms, and to help set a positive example for computer users around the globe." -- Zoë Kooyman, Executive Director of the Free Software Foundation


TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Free Software Foundation announces new executive director, Zoë Kooyman
  • My appointment as the FSF's new executive director
  • The LibrePlanet 2022: "Living Liberation" schedule is here for 19 & 20 March
  • Publication of the FSF-funded white papers on questions around Copilot
  • Intel SGX proves Blu-ray DRM is defective by design
  • This year, take some time to reflect on why you love free software
  • Trisquel 10 release announcement
  • How cheap ink cartridges can cost you dear
  • Apple v. Corellium demonstrates a clear example of fair use
  • The worst timeline: A printer company is putting DRM in paper now
  • A network of fake test answer sites is trying to incriminate students
  • History of women in computing: GNU Girls
  • IRS backs away from facial recognition
  • Reps. Mondaire Jones and Victoria Spartz introduce Freedom to Repair Act
  • March GNU Emacs news
  • Join the FSF and friends in updating the Free Software Directory
  • LibrePlanet featured resource: Copilot Watch Group
  • February GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: Nineteen new GNU releases!
  • FSF and other free software events
  • Thank GNUs!
  • GNU copyright contributions
  • Translations of the Free Software Supporter
  • Take action with the FSF!

View this issue online here: https://www.fsf.org/free-software-supporter/2022/march

Encourage your friends to subscribe and help us build an audience by adding our subscriber widget to your Web site.

Miss an issue? You can catch up on back issues at https://www.fsf.org/free-software-supporter.

Want to read this newsletter translated into another language? Scroll to the end to read the Supporter in French and Spanish.


Free Software Foundation announces new executive director, Zoë Kooyman

From March 1

Kooyman was appointed by the Free Software Foundation (FSF) board following a careful selection process that included a review by a FSF staff committee and evaluation criteria such as management, fundraising, business and finance, legal, and technical skills. She succeeds John Sullivan, who served as executive director for twelve years. Read more about the FSF's new executive director and the transition.

My appointment as the FSF's new executive director

From March 1

This morning, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) announced my appointment as its new executive director with the press release below. I am excited to take on this new role and thrilled about the opportunities that the FSF has to move the fight for free software forward.

The LibrePlanet 2022: Living Liberation schedule is here for 19 & 20 March

From February 25

The schedule for this year's LibrePlanet has been announced. Read more about the speakers, talks, and topics for this year's conference.

Publication of the FSF-funded white papers on questions around Copilot

From February 24

In our call for papers, we set forth several areas of interest. Most of these areas centered around copyright law, questions of ownership for AI-generated code, and legal impacts for GitHub authors who use a GNU or other copyleft license(s) for their works. We are pleased to announce the community-provided research into these areas, and much more.

Intel SGX proves Blu-ray DRM is defective by design

From February 15

Proceeding the deprecation of the SGX in processors, the DRM implemented by Intel will cause 4K streams to be downgraded to lower-quality 1080p. This is bad news for anyone affected by this change, but also the inevitable outcome of a defective design. Contact Intel to let them know they should show respect to their users by never implementing features designed for DRM.

This year, take some time to reflect on why you love free software

From February 11

February 14 is I Love Free Software Day, started by Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE), and this year we took time to reflect upon why we love free software. We also asked others to do the same, and our fellow free software supporters told us how they enjoy computing in freedom. We also shared steps for how to create a fun image to share with friends and family.

Trisquel 10 release announcement

From February 1 by Trisquel

Read about the latest updates to the newest release of Trisquel, one of the GNU/Linux distributions fully endorsed by the FSF.

How cheap ink cartridges can cost you dear

From February 19 by Miles Brignall

For years, Hewlett-Packard (HP) has been using firmware updates to force users to purchase their ink. HP claims that ink created by other manufacturers infringes its copyright, and utilizes Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) to prevent users from using other ink.

Apple v. Corellium demonstrates a clear example of fair use

From February 16 by John Bergmayer

Is the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) compatible with fair use? Apple's lawsuit against Corellium is testing the boundaries. Read the article to learn how the courts are viewing fair use arguments that have an immediate impact on students and researchers.

The worst timeline: A printer company is putting DRM in paper now

From February 15 by Cory Doctorow

New printers by Dymo use radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips to implement DRM, restricting what label-rolls can be used. This company is trying to leverage its unjust power to generate profit at users' expense.

A network of fake test answer sites is trying to incriminate students

From February 15 by Colin Lecher

A company called "Honorlock," according to its materials, provides a way to track cheating students through what it calls “seed sites” or others call “honeypots” -- fake Web sites that remotely tattle on students who visit them during exams. Read more about the implications to student privacy.

History of women in computing: GNU Girls

From February 9 by Cesar Brod

Did you know about GNU Girls, GNUrias, and how they changed the history of computing? This article details the beginnings of the GNU Girls and how they, among other things, "hosted an IT nursery for the children of the landless, homeless workers, and other movements, when their parents were attending meetings in the forums."

IRS backs away from facial recognition

From February 7 by Ron Wyden

US Internal Revenue Service (IRS) announced an end to its plans to implement facial recognition, via third party company ID.me, on its Web site. The IRS's decision to reverse its decision is due to public outcry. Opposition came from Republicans and Democrats alike, as well as civil liberty groups, who expressed worries about the privacy of uploading sensitive data, historical biases in facial recognition, susceptibility to cyberattacks, inaccessibility to people without broadband and a lack of audits and other forms of accountability.

Reps. Mondaire Jones and Victoria Spartz introduce Freedom to Repair Act

From February 2 by Mondaire Jones

New US legislation was introduced to legalize repairing your own devices. Currently, some companies, ranging from Big Tech to Big Ag, are abusing copyright law to deny people the right to repair their own devices or take them to locally-owned repair shops, which can subject these small businesses to civil or criminal penalties. To guarantee the freedom to repair, this legislation would legalize repairing what you own or taking it to the repair shop of your choice.

February GNU Emacs news

From February 28 by Sacha Chua

In these issues: Doom Emacs, Emacs Ninja, "I want to give up Vim," and more!

Join the FSF and friends in updating the Free Software Directory

Tens of thousands of people visit https://directory.fsf.org each month to discover free software. Each entry in the Directory contains a wealth of useful information, from basic category and descriptions to version control, IRC channels, documentation, and licensing. The Free Software Directory has been a great resource to software users over the past decade, but it needs your help staying up-to-date with new and exciting free software projects.

To help, join our weekly IRC meetings on Fridays. Meetings take place in the #fsf channel on Libera.Chat, and usually include a handful of regulars as well as newcomers. Libera.Chat is accessible from any IRC client -- Everyone's welcome!

The next meeting is Friday, March 4 from 12pm to 3pm EST (17:00 to 20:00 UTC). Details here:

LibrePlanet featured resource: Copilot Watch Group

For this month, we are highlighting Copilot Watch Group, which provides information about the implications of autogenerated code, generated by way of machine learning, trained on software (mostly free/libre and copyleft) hosted on GitHub. You are invited to adopt, spread, and improve this important resource.

Do you have a suggestion for next month's featured resource? Let us know at campaigns@fsf.org.

February GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: Nineteen new GNU releases!

19 new GNU releases in the past month (as of February 27, 2022):

For announcements of most new GNU releases, subscribe to the info-gnu mailing list: https://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/info-gnu.

To download: Nearly all GNU software is available from https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/, or preferably one of its mirrors from https://www.gnu.org/prep/ftp.html. You can use the URL https://ftpmirror.gnu.org/ to be automatically redirected to a (hopefully) nearby and up-to-date mirror.

A number of GNU packages, as well as the GNU operating system as a whole, are looking for maintainers and other assistance: please see https://www.gnu.org/server/takeaction.html#unmaint if you'd like to help. The general page on how to help GNU is at https://www.gnu.org/help/help.html.

If you have a working or partly working program that you'd like to offer to the GNU project as a GNU package, see https://www.gnu.org/help/evaluation.html.

FSF and other free software events

Thank GNUs!

We appreciate everyone who donates to the Free Software Foundation, and we'd like to give special recognition to the folks who have donated $500 or more in the last month.

This month, a big Thank GNU to:

  • David Bruce
  • Emin Martinian and Esme Baker
  • Evan Klitzke
  • Jason Compton
  • Jim Meyering
  • Nicholas Butterworth
  • René Genz
  • Sam Ritchie

You can add your name to this list by donating at https://donate.fsf.org/.

GNU copyright contributions

Assigning your copyright to the Free Software Foundation helps us defend the GNU GPL and keep software free. The following individuals have assigned their copyright to the FSF (and allowed public appreciation) in the past month:

  • Andrei Tropin (GNU Emacs)
  • Erik Auerswald (GNU Inetutils)
  • Trey Jamal Peacock (GNU Emacs)

Want to see your name on this list? Contribute to GNU and assign your copyright to the FSF.

Translations of the Free Software Supporter

El Free Software Supporter está disponible en español. Para ver la versión en español haz click aqui: https://www.fsf.org/free-software-supporter/2022/marzo

Para cambiar las preferencias de usuario y recibir los próximos números del Supporter en español, haz click aquí: https://my.fsf.org/civicrm/profile/create?reset=1&gid=34&id={contact.contact_id}&{contact.checksum}

Le Free Software Supporter est disponible en français. Pour voir la version française cliquez ici: https://www.fsf.org/free-software-supporter/2022/mars

Pour modifier vos préférences et recevoir les prochaines publications du Supporter en français, cliquez ici: https://my.fsf.org/civicrm/profile/create?reset=1&gid=34&id={contact.contact_id}&{contact.checksum}

Take action with the FSF!

Contributions from thousands of individual associate members enable the FSF's work. You can contribute by joining at https://my.fsf.org/join. If you're already a member, you can help refer new members (and earn some rewards) by adding a line with your member number to your email signature like:

I'm an FSF member -- Help us support software freedom! https://my.fsf.org/join

The FSF is always looking for volunteers (https://www.fsf.org/volunteer). From rabble-rousing to hacking, from issue coordination to envelope stuffing -- there's something here for everybody to do. Also, head over to our campaigns section (https://www.fsf.org/campaigns) and take action on software patents, Digital Restrictions Management, free software adoption, OpenDocument, and more.

Do you read and write Portuguese and English? The FSF is looking for translators for Free Software Supporter. Please send an email to campaigns@fsf.org with your interest and a list of your experience and qualifications.


Copyright © 2022 Free Software Foundation, Inc.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.coming soon

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