Skip to content, sitemap or skip to search.

Personal tools
Join now
You are here: Home FSF Events John Sullivan - "<script src="trap.js"></script>" (Copyleftconf, Brussels, Belgium)

John Sullivan - "<script src="trap.js"></script>" (Copyleftconf, Brussels, Belgium)

by Jeanne Rasata Contributions Published on Jan 16, 2019 09:31 AM
Brussels, Belgium
When Feb 04, 2019

from 11:40 AM to 12:10 PM
Where Brussels, Belgium

FSF executive director John Sullivan will be speaking at CopyleftConf (2019-02-04):

User freedom is being trampled by JavaScript. Can't copyleft help here as it has in other areas? Copyleft's traditional requirements have been seen as ill-suited. We'll talk about what's happened, what the future holds for copyleft here, and a little about how these challenges relate to the broader issue of copyleft's relevance to users' freedom while interacting with network services.

Even with no nonfree packages installed, most users are running nonfree software constantly, in the form of proprietary JavaScript executed on their local machines as they interact with the Web. Much of it doesn't have to be nonfree, because it is available elsewhere under a lax permissive license. But it is almost always distributed to users in minified, unreadable form, with no license notice or source code. Other JavaScript is intentionally unfree, and too often up to no good—invading privacy, enforcing Digital Restrictions Management (DRM), making Web sites defective by design.

Traditional requirements of copyleft licenses, like providing a copy of the license with the software, and including the source code or an offer of how to get it, have been seen as onerous or ill-suited in the context of JavaScript. The Free Software Foundation has proposed and implemented licensing metadata methods by which JavaScript that is intended to be free software can clearly say so, and therefore actually respect the freedom of its users. This is the first step in compliant and realistic distribution of copyleft-licensed JavaScript, as well as a step toward allowing free software users to run only free software inside the browser as they do outside the browser.

Since the guidelines were announced in 2012, the problem has gotten much worse. We'll talk about what's happened, what the future holds for copyleft in this space, and a little about how the challenges in this area relate to the broader issue of copyleft's relevance to users' freedom while interacting with network services.

Location: DigitYser, Boulevard d’Anvers 40, 1000 Bruxelles, Belgium

We hope you can attend the speech, or meet John at the conference.

Please fill out our contact form, so that we can contact you about future events in and around Brussels.

More information about this event…

Document Actions
Filed under:

The FSF is a charity with a worldwide mission to advance software freedom — learn about our history and work.

fsf.org is powered by:

 

Send your feedback on our translations and new translations of pages to campaigns@fsf.org.