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You are here: Home FSF News Breaking the dependency on proprietary software: A call to nonprofits to refuse Microsoft Windows 7

Breaking the dependency on proprietary software: A call to nonprofits to refuse Microsoft Windows 7

by peterb Contributions Published on Oct 08, 2009 05:13 PM
"sinking money and time into proprietary software is inconsistent with the core values of freedom and progress."

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA -- Wednesday, October 7th, 2009 -- The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today launched the next stage of its "Windows 7 Sins" campaign at http://windows7sins.org, making the case against Microsoft and proprietary software by writing to 500 leaders of the most influential nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) worldwide, asking them to make the switch to freedom-respecting free software, and to help foster awareness of the ethical importance of computer user freedom.

The letter warns these "Windows 7 decision makers" about the "lack of privacy, freedom, and security" they will suffer should they adopt Windows 7, and makes the case that they should instead adopt free software by outlining seven major areas where proprietary software like Windows is hurting society: invading privacy, poisoning education, locking users in, abusing standards, leveraging monopolistic behavior, enforcing Digital Restrictions Management (DRM), and threatening user security.

FSF executive director Peter Brown said, "The dependency of organizations working for social change and improvement on software owned and exclusively controlled by Microsoft is leading society into an era of digital restrictions, threatening and limiting our freedoms. Free software on the other hand, is about freedom, not price, and it is designed to give you the ability to study and improve the software for your own needs. Today, we're asking leaders in the nonprofit sector to switch to the free software GNU/Linux operating system for all their desktop and computer infrastructure needs."

The GNU/Linux operating system is readily available, easy-to-use, and supported by numerous vendors and a worldwide community. GNU/Linux distributions come with thousands of freely licensed software applications, including complete accounting and fundraising solutions suitable for charities.

FSF campaigns manager Matt Lee added, "Charities, NGOs, and other nonprofit organizations that choose proprietary software are undertaking bad public policy, often through misinformation or a failure to see their technology choices as connected to their social missions. We hope to alert these decision makers to the positive contribution they can make to society by switching their organizations to free software. I hope these groups will make a public policy commitment to freedom and join a growing list of organizations who understand that sinking money and time into proprietary software is inconsistent with the core values of freedom and progress."

More information about the campaign, including the text of the letter and a mailing list that will provide subscribers with information updates and action alerts, is online at http://en.windows7sins.org.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at fsf.org and gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at http://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

About Free Software and Open Source

The free software movement's goal is freedom for computer users. Some, especially corporations, advocate a different viewpoint, known as "open source," which cites only practical goals such as making software powerful and reliable, focuses on development models, and avoids discussion of ethics and freedom. These two viewpoints are different at the deepest level. For more explanation, see http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/open-source-misses-the-point.html.

Media Contacts

Matt Lee
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
Cell: +1 (617) 500.3284
campaigns@fsf.org

Peter Brown
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
Cell: +1 (617) 319.5832
campaigns@fsf.org

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