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Richard Stallman's blog

by Free Software Foundation Contributions Published on Mar 09, 2010 04:11 PM

Fireworks in Montreal (2005-07-01 to 2005-07-05)

For the beginning of July I went to Montreal. I had been invited for a conference on software and education, but it seems like too much of a rush to stay for just two days, and not efficient to make the trip for just one speech. So I arranged a second speech at the University of Quebec.

Fireworks in Montreal (2005-07-01 to 2005-07-05) - Read More…

Belgium and Spain (2005-05-31 to 2005-06-19)

Stallman spoke in front of the Greens in the European Parliament in Brussels on June 2, 2005. As keynote speaker, Stallman spoke on Free Software and Software Patents, introducing the event centered on software patents in Europe.

Belgium and Spain (2005-05-31 to 2005-06-19) - Read More…

Second visit to Taiwan (2005-05-22 to 2005-05-30)

Stopping first at the National Taiwan University, Stallman gave a speech to 200 Computer Science students who had only been slightly exposed to free software. He then moved on to the Institute of Information Science, Academia Sinica in Taipei, participating in a panel discussion on "Copyright vs. Community in the Age of Computer Networks" for copyright researchers, their assistants, and legal scholars. The final speech of the trip took place at the National Center for High-Performance Computing (NCHPC) in Xinzhu. For NCHPC scientists, engineers, university faculty and students, Stallman gave a speech entitled "The Free Software Movement and the GNU/Linux Operating System."

Second visit to Taiwan (2005-05-22 to 2005-05-30) - Read More…

Moors, Christians, and no Atheists (2005-04-26 to 2005-05-09)

A whirlwind trip around Spain in late April brought Stallman to places such as Granada, Ourense, Vigo, Galicia, La Coruna, Madrid, Castellon and Valencia. In La Coruna and in Castellon, he met with Computer Science students. Madrid's Fundacion Conocimiento Libre (Free Knowledge Foundation) named Stallman an "Honor's Patron" and invited him to give a speech there. He visited Spain coming directly from Sofia, Bulgaria, and he leaves immediately after for Bologna, Italy. After Granada I stopped for one day in Madrid, where I participated in a protest against software patents. There was a protest at everyuniversity in Spain, and I read that 15,000 people participated.

Moors, Christians, and no Atheists (2005-04-26 to 2005-05-09) - Read More…

The Alhambra Inalambrica

Stallman visits The Alhambra in Spain during a trip to the University of Granada. The Alhambra was one of the sites I arranged to see when I visited Spain almost ten years ago, before I could speak much Spanish. I found it amazingly beautiful, but time had eaten away at the memories.I could still remember how I was struck by its beauty, but I could not remember anything specific about what I had seen. So when I was invited to speak in Granada, I eagerly accepted.

The Alhambra Inalambrica - Read More…

Too Late for Bulgaria (2005-04-19 to 2005-04-22)

For an open audience of university students and the public interested in Free Software, Stallman attended a videoconference in Sofia, Bulgaria. In 1995, of all the countries in Europe, the one I would most have loved to visit was Bulgaria. Bulgarian folk dances were the most exciting, and I loved to do them. I loved the music as well, and learned to play many of the tunes on my recorder. It is no coincidence that I used a Bulgarian folk dance tune for the Free Software Song. If anyone had invited me to Bulgaria, I would have arranged to stay there for a few weeks, and found an opportunity to study dancing and listen to a lot of music. However, Bulgaria in the 90s had other priorities. No one ever invited me to go there andspeak.

Too Late for Bulgaria (2005-04-19 to 2005-04-22) - Read More…

Impressions of Syria (2005-02-28 to 2005-03-03)

In late February, when I mentioned to people in Europe that I was soon going to Syria, they were worried for me. They thought that the tension resulting from the US decision to blame Syria for the assassination of Hariri would somehow make visiting Syria dangerous.

Impressions of Syria (2005-02-28 to 2005-03-03) - Read More…

Delhi (2005-01-31 to 2005-02-03)

I arrived at Delhi at 3am on a flight that had been delayed by an hour and a half. I had expected to do a lot of work on the flight, but I was unexpectedly drowsy and nodded off for a few hours. When I arrived at the airport, the wait for passport control was only 20 minutes, and I spent part of the time explaining free software to another passenger who was curious about it. My bag was already in the carousel when I reached it, so I exited into the terminal and passed along the line of people holding up signs. None had my name on it. The person who was supposed to meet me was not there.

Delhi (2005-01-31 to 2005-02-03) - Read More…

Bolivia (2005-01-19 to 2005-01-27)

Visiting Bolivia provided an opportunity for me to spend a week with Tania. I had better explain that Tania isn't just my friend; she's my sweetheart. Since she lives in Colombia, it isn't easy for us to spend time together. I used frequent flier miles to get her a ticket to Bolivia while I was to be there. In arranging this trip, I agreed to go speak in Santa Cruz provided either I went there for a very short time or Tania could go with me. The day before going to Bolivia was when I learned that the trip to Santa Cruz had been arranged for both of us together.

Bolivia (2005-01-19 to 2005-01-27) - Read More…

Response to Fox News Article

Jim Prendergast's recent article mistakenly called me a "leader in the open source community". While I appreciate the praise that might be read into that expression, it is not the case: I do not advocate "open source" and never did. I founded the Free Software Movement in 1984. "Free", here refers to freedom, not price; specifically the freedom to redistribute and change the software you use. With free software, the users control the software; with non-free software, the developer has control of the software and its users.

Response to Fox News Article - Read More…

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